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Why do we celebrate Diwali?

Diwali diya

The Sanskrit word “Deepavali,” which means “rows of illuminated lamps,” is where the English word “Diwali” originates. Every household in India decorates for the occasion with colorful lights, Poojai items and little lamps called diyas.

There are merry songs and dances, and people decorate the streets and buildings with festive illumination. Sparkling fireworks are set off, producing a show of sound and light. This aids in warding off evil spirits and commemorating the triumph of good over evil.

Many people see Diwali as a new beginning, much like the Lunar New Year in January. In order to get ready for the new year, many individuals clean, repair, and decorate their homes as well as purchase Diwali gift boxes and new clothing.

Diwali is a time for forgiveness and debt repayment. People frequently arrange family reunions and get in touch with loved ones who may have fallen out of touch. Along the disputed border, Indian and Pakistani soldiers have in the past given candies as a sign of goodwill for Diwali.

The celebration of Diwali is for you if you are a divine person. Buying presents for others is the most important tradition. Indian sweets in vibrant boxes, Diwali gift boxes, and other goodies are traded amongst friends and family. Your colorful candy boxes and Diwali gift boxes excite the kids when you bring them home. Your happiness and fulfillment are brought to you by the celebration during Diwali.

Why is Diwali important?

The Story Behind Diwali Celebration:

Every faith celebrates a unique Diwali legend and historical occasion.

According to one of the major Hindu myths, Diwali marks the return to their home country by Lord Rama, his wife Sita Devi, and their brother Lakshmana after 14 years of exile. After Rama vanquished Ravana, the demon king, the locals lit a route for him. Celebrations in various areas include reenactments of this tale.

Hindu mythology also associates Diwali with the day Lord Krishna defeated the demonic Narakasura and set the inhabitants of his kingdom free. Lord Krishna made it a festive day after killing the demon. In some regions of India, people celebrate by burning the effigies of the demon kings from both tales.

Diwali is also the time when Hindus honor the goddess Lakshmi. The romantic Diwali narrative claims that the goddess of prosperity, wealth, and fertility married Lord Vishnu, one of Hinduism’s most revered deities, on the eve of Diwali.

Diwali overlaps with harvest and new year festivals in various civilizations. No matter whatever Diwali tale you celebrate, the day is always one of fresh starts and victory of light over darkness.

Beautiful yet simple Diwali Pooja decorations for your house :

Start With the Pooja Room

Your pooja room, which serves as the hub of action throughout the holy celebrations, needs special attention at this time. No matter how elaborate or small your pooja nook is, go all out when decorating it. Place some lamps with an antique brass finish all around the pedestal. On all the days leading up to Diwali, don’t forget to decorate it with fresh flowers, diyas, and incense sticks.

Festival of lights

Get Going With Colorful flower Rangoli

Do you know why marigold flowers are used to adorn homes during this time of year? The smell of these flowers, which are also known as “herbs of the sun,” uplifts your spirit and reduces tension. Bright orange and yellow also symbolize fresh beginnings and wealth in life.

Therefore, we advise you to buy a few fresh bundles of them from a nearby flower store and use them to adorn your entranceways! You can also set up a setup on your dining tables so that the sweets and namkeens are available. We’ll leave it to your creativity to decide how to use these flowers to decorate your home for Diwali.

Diwali rangoli

Decorate your Front Door

Don’t forget to obtain some lovely torans, which are normally offered in a variety of forms and sizes, when decorating the door for Diwali. Even after the celebrations, you can leave these hanging to maintain a warm atmosphere in your home all year long. The main door is typically decorated with torans to welcome visitors and Goddess Lakshmi with color and joy. People see this right away when they walk in, and it immediately makes them feel better.

Diwali celebration

Why is Diwali called the festival of lights :

The primary symbol of Diwali is a diya which is also called “Deepam” in India. A diya is a little clay oil lamp. Diyas are often composed of dirt, and to aid in their burning, cotton wicks are placed in a pool of ghee or vegetable oil. Some can be painted with lovely designs and colors, while others are sold in their natural state.

Since these tiny lights play such a significant role in the celebration, the word “Diyas” is really derived from them. Deepavali, which is Sanskrit for “the row of lights,” is where the name Diwali originates. The Sanskrit word for the row is “avali,” and the word for diya is “deep.”

The primary symbol of Diwali is a diya, which is pronounced “dee-ya.” A diya is a little clay oil lamp. Diyas are often composed of dirt, and to aid in their burning, cotton wicks are placed in a pool of ghee or vegetable oil. Some can be painted with lovely designs and colors, while others are sold in their natural state.

Since these tiny lanterns play such a significant role in the celebration, the word “Diyas” is really derived from them. Deepavali, which is Sanskrit for “the row of lights,” is where the name Diwali originates. The Sanskrit word for the row is “avali,” and the word for diya is “deep.”

Diwali deepam

Diwali puja samagri list and its benefits:

People decorate their front doors to welcome luck, wealth, and prosperity. To add more divinity proper traditional puja samagri is added to the list,

  1. Kumkum – One of the best headache remedies.  It instantly relieves stress in the forehead muscles.
  2. Chandan –Indian sandalwood is thought to possess potent spiritual qualities. It is the most often used incense for meditation, prayer, and other spiritual practices across many religions since it is thought to increase one’s connection to the divine, promote peace and cleanse the mind.
  3. Haldi – Manjal is a traditional powder that symbolizes sanctity, spiritual vitality, and prosperity. It is natural and pure, which has a holy quality and an auspicious powder that keeps us calm and composed.
  4. Roli – Roli Tilak reduces headache symptoms. The house is said to fill up with food, money, and good fortune.
  5. Akshat – Unbroken rice grains, or akshat, are sacrificed in order to attract wealth and success. They are presented to the gods while mantras are chanted.
  6. Paan and SupariIt also symbolizes loyalty and a strong bond. We can place Supari along with Paan in Havan Kunda before we start a puja or Yagna.
  7. Whole coconut with its husk – It is presented as a sacrifice to the gods. Additionally, coconut is employed in the creation of protective armor. Coconut can be utilized to summon any kind of divine energy. The power of spells is also employed to subdue the enemy.
  8. Incense Sticks – Burn Incense sticks to Spread the fragrance of Positivity.
  9. Oil for the lamp – Gingelly Oil can be applied to the scalp before a purifying bath as well as lit at home to spread positive vibes and energy.
  10. Diya – Light your Diya to extinguish the darkness and illuminate the right path.
  11. Gangajal – Adding a small amount of Ganga Jal to your bath water helps to remove all your impurities.
  12. Mango leaves & flowers – Hinduism places a lot of importance on mango blooms and leaves. It has a rich history and significance. It is also said to fulfill a great number of wishes.
  13. Dhoop – Dhoop cones bring you Countless blessings and Happiness.
Diwali gift boxes

How to celebrate Diwali more special at home by being Eco-friendly:

  1. Save Electricity Consumption:
    Instead of using conventional electronic lights, which waste a lot of energy, enjoy the event the old-fashioned way by lighting candles and days instead. Decorate our homes with rangolis, flowers, LED lamps, and lights.
  2. Use fewer fireworks:
    Many people, especially kids, cannot celebrate Diwali without them. Since the air and noise pollution brought on by firecrackers must also be taken into account. One solution to this issue is to celebrate Diwali as a community. Everyone will get to set off crackers, but there will be fewer of them.
  3. Use less plastic:
    Diwali shopping is one of the celebrations of Diwali that everyone looks forward to! But when you go shopping, you use lots of plastic bags. Say “No” to plastic shopping bags and choose instead for cloth bags the next time you go shopping.
  4. Natural Rangoli Colors:
    Diwali celebrations are greatly influenced by rangolis. Although pretty and colorful decorations make our homes look lovely, synthetic colors are hazardous when absorbed and can have major negative effects on one’s health.
    Instead, use rangolis which may be constructed with flowers, or use eco-friendly paints that don’t hurt the environment. It’s simple to find organic rangoli colors in the markets.

Hope the festival of lights sends you sparkling sparkles of pleasure, love, and peace that last for the rest of this year. May your life always be filled with light from the lamp of joy. Poojai wishes you an eco-friendly and happy Diwali.

Happy Diwali